Coldwell Banker Tulsa Real Estate

Relocating

Relocating?
We Can Help, No Matter Where You are Going

In today’s challenging real estate market, it’s more important than ever to work with an
agent you can trust-one who’s specially-trained to assist relocating employees
and held to high performance standards that ensure superior service.

Contact me today for details
Paula Rieckman
p: 918.392.3655
e: prieckman@cbtulsa.com
Why Relocate to Tulsa?

Key Facts
In 2010, the estimated population of downtown is 4,000. The daytime population is estimated to be 36,000. Downtown Tulsa is an area of approximately 1.4 square miles surrounded by an inner-dispersal loop created by Interstate 244, Highway 64, and Highway 75. The area serves as Tulsa's financial and business district, and is the focus of a large initiative to draw tourism, which includes plans to capitalize on the area's historic architecture. Much of Tulsa's convention space is located in downtown, such as the Tulsa Performing Arts Center and the Tulsa Convention Center, and the BOK Center. Prominent downtown sub-districts include the Blue Dome District, the Brady Arts district, and the Greenwood Historical District, Owen Park Historical Neighborhood, the site of ONEOK Field, a baseball stadium for the Tulsa Drillers.

Education
Tulsa Public Schools is the largest school district in Oklahoma. Each of the public districts in the county has a single high school, except for Tulsa Public Schools, which has nine. The Tulsa district also includes several charter schools.
Downtown Tulsa Sees Economic Boom
A number of large financial corporations are headquartered in Tulsa, the largest being the BOK Financial Corporation. The semi-national convenience store chain QuikTrip, Hilti, and Mazzio's semi-national pizza chain also call Tulsa home. Many international oil and gas-related companies have headquarters in Tulsa, including Williams Companies, SemGroup, Syntroleum, ONEOK, Samson and Excel Energy.

Meanwhile, there are 30 companies in Tulsa that employ more than 1,000 people, though small businesses make up more than 80% of the city's companies.

A development initiative, Vision 2025, promised to incite economic growth and recreate lost jobs. Projects spurred by the initiative promised urban revitalization, infrastructure improvement, tourism development, riverfront retail development, and further diversification of the economy. As of 2007, employment levels have surpassed pre-recession heights and the city is in a significant economic development and investment surge. This economic improvement is also seen in Tulsa’s housing trends which show an average of a 6% increase in rent in 2010. Since 2006, more than 28,000 jobs have been added to the city.


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